Tivoli mansion

Tivoli Mansion is the oldest building in the area of today’s Tivoli Park. It connects to the city through the Jakopič Promenade, which was widened in the 1930s by architect Jože Plečnik, who planted a new border of trees on each side. The history of the mansion itself dates back to the 13th century, when a tower stood over the current location, which was demolished in 1442 by the Counts of Celje in the battles with the Austrian Emperor Frederick III to gain power over Ljubljana. Baron George Apfaltrern had a new court built on the present location, which was purchased in 1601 by the Ljubljana Jesuits and replaced with a new mansion building. The Jesuits purchased the neighbouring plots of land and the surroundings of the mansion became a pleasant promenade, whereas the natural amphitheatre behind the building was used to stage plays by the Jesuit students. When the Jesuit Order was dissolved in 1775, the mansion became the summer residence of the Ljubljana Bishop. Later it was passed on into the hands of the Provincial Estates and served as a hospital, warehouse and army barracks, which severely damaged the building. Emperor Franz Joseph had the mansion restored in May 1853 and gave it to Marshal Radetzky and his wife for lifelong use. Radetzky renovated the surroundings and opened the park to the public, for which the grateful people granted him honorary citizenship in 1882 and erected a statue in front of the mansion. The fountain with the statue of a boy that is so famous in Slovenia today was erected in the park in April 1870, and this was probably also the time when the striking four large bronze dogs without tongues by Anton Dominik Fernkorn were also installed on the steps in front of the mansion. At this point investments into the mansion ceased. Initially, city officials were housed in the mansion, and then tenants after the Second World War, who lived there until 1986, when renovation work began on the building for the opening of the International Centre of Graphic Arts. The Tivoli Mansion building is listed as a protected monument.


Photo: Urška Boljkovac. MGLC Archive.

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Samuel Grajfoner: The Material Presence of the Mental Imprint

21. 1.–8. 3. 2022
MGLC - Tivoli Mansion

The exhibition presents large-format prints in the techniques of engraving and drypoint, created in recent years and mostly presented to the public for the first time. They reflect the artist's understanding of the creative process as a spontaneous, organic development of the preparation of the matrix, which materialises in an impression on paper or, for the first time, in bronze. 

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Samuel Grajfoner, Untitled (from the cycle Nothing), 2021, engraving

Adriena Šimotová: Encounter. Touch and Imprint.

10 December 2021 to 8 March 2022
Tivoli Mansion

You are welcome to visit the exhibition Encounter. Touch and Imprint. by Adriena Šimotová. This selective retrospective at MGLC features artworks in which Šimotová radicalized the existentially conceived topic of the human personality while engaging in an earnest determination of the conditions and relationships she found relevant. 

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Mi smo tisti, ki jih iščemo I–V, 2011–12, transparentni papir, pigment, pastel, grafit, 111 x 79 cm, Fundacija Adriene Šimotove in Jiříja Johna, Praga

Adrijan Praznik: --WHERE OUR HEARTS HAVE LED US…

7. 1.−13. 2. 2022
MGLC Švicarija

Adrijan Praznik plays various roles in the world of art – he is a painter, illustrator, curator, producer and artistic director of Simulaker Gallery in Novo mesto. In January 2022, he completed a two-year artist residency at MGLC Švicarija. Upon his departure, he prepared the exhibition --WHERE OUR HEARTS HAVE LED US... The spatial installation of two large-scale paintings raises questions that illustrate his work and research focus in 2021 particularly. Namely, he is concerned with the form and status of the artwork, the appropriation of the media image and the combination of pictorial means of expression as well as materials.

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Photo: Urška Boljkovac. MGLC Archive.